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Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

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Trusted Contributor

Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Doesn't matter for this thread what sort of cutlery, plated or solid or 'Sheffield". Do you regularly use silver cutlery?
13 REPLIES
Trusted Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

This to do with cleaning. What do you use, how often?
Respected Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Mainly used sheffield steel, BUT I do have some solid silver cutlery for special occasions (and this is heavy).

 

I just use baking soda and water to form a paste then put ona dry cloth. Buff the silver, rubbing vigorously. When clean, wash in water, dry and buff. The cutlery is now ready for use. This should be done when needed AND at least weekly.

 

Important not to use chemicals that might damage the silver OR damage you.

Trusted Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Well. I had a marketing idea, you see, to do with cleaning cutlery - it doesn't matter whether it's .925 solid Sterling or EPNS, it's all the same. Anyway, it's probably been done before. C'est la vie.

Trusted Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Yes, all the time, @User1.  Not showing off - it's just what everybody had in the early 1900s and I inherited loads of it.  I clean it with what used to be called Goddard's Silver Dip but now has another name.  For bigger pieces, like a wine cooler, I use Goddard's pink cream stuff, which is easier to apply and has a better finish.

Respected Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

I only have a few pieces of silver cutlery now because I found I don't use it as much as I used to.

I used to get out the set of silver cutlery passed through the family when I had dinner parties, which was a lot when we were younger.

 

I don't need the extra work involved in cleaning the silver so I passed my set on so it carries on in the family.

 

I used to make a paste like @Tanith mentions to clean mine but I have used a silver cleaner. To be honest I think the bicarb paste is better.

I have heard that toothpaste is a good cleaner for silver cutlery as well @User1

 

If your luck isn't what it could be put a 'P' before it .

Super Lidler Class of 2016
Valued Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

We being of the pleb classes have no silver, however up at the big house they have loads, I did notice that they no longer keep their cutlery in plush fitted cases. The now use large biscuit tins with a layer of cutlery a layer of garden fleece a layer of cutlery, finally on top they pace a bag of silica gel, they assure me that this has removed the need to polish. No moisture, no tarnish.  The earl and countess have asked me to let them know how you go on if you adopt their method. @User1@Tanith@harryflatters@Tarantula

Trusted Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Impressed anyone might think we have any silver cutlery but sadly not!  We do have some silver pieces though including what I think is called a Rose Bowl (think Punch Bowls have hooks round the side and this one doesn't).  It's about 18 inches in diameter and very ornately decorated and 'chased' - it's an absolute nightmare to clean!! @Tombola @User1 @tommiesgirl @Duchess @Tanith

Valued Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

Get yoursen to a craft shop. Delve back to thirteen year old nick and his balsa wood glider. The wings were painted with " Chinese laquer" we called "dope" after polishing wash and thoroughly dry said silver object. Laquer, throw away silver polish. not for food use, repeated washing will render useless. @harryflatters

Trusted Contributor

Re: Do you use silver plated/plate cutlery?

I started a bit younger than that @Tombola but I well remember the fiddly business of carefully applying tissue paper to the finished balsa wood frame, which had been built bit by painstaking bit from plans.  This would then be lightly sprayed with water and left to dry to tighten it by shrinkage.  Then several layers of 'dope' would be applied and it's fumes could make you quite 'high'!  A bit later, plastic sheet called 'Solar Film' came in.  This had the advantage of being stronger and didn't need doping as well as coming in almost any colour you like.  Having appllied this as smoothly as you could you then took Mum's hairdryer to it which would shrink it - as long as you didn't get it too hot, when it would melt!  The 'window' between the two was quite small I seem to remember!