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Valued Contributor
Posts: 758
Registered: ‎09-11-2016

Bat in the Bedroom

I have a bat in my bedroom! Should I just keep the window open and hope it goes?

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,436
Registered: ‎20-02-2015

Re: Bat in the Bedroom

I don't know how I would feel if I found a bat in my room but I looked it up on the web and this page may be useful for you @BigAll

http://www.bats.org.uk/pages/bats_repeatedly_found_in_house.html

 

It does say to dim the lights and leave the windows open in the room but it also gives you a lot of other useful information that you may need to follow up @BigAll

If your luck isn't what it could be put a 'P' before it .

Super Lidler Class of 2016
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,053
Registered: ‎23-02-2015

Re: Bat in the Bedroom

How wonderful.

 

Call the batman! OR just open the window at night.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,432
Registered: ‎08-03-2016

Re: Bat in the Bedroom

Lucky you, @BigAll!  They are unutterably cute.  I wonder which type it is?  My village, which has limestone caves, has 14 out of the 15 (other numbers are available;  I'm innumerate) species of bat in the country.  Might be the biggest bat home/nest/cave/resting place in the country.  I would love to see them.  When one strayed into my garage, I had to have the Bat Person round.  We drank a bottle of red whilst waiting for the little darling to leave......

Valued Contributor
Posts: 758
Registered: ‎09-11-2016

Re: Bat in the Bedroom


Duchess wrote:

Lucky you, @BigAll!  They are unutterably cute.  I wonder which type it is?  My village, which has limestone caves, has 14 out of the 15 (other numbers are available;  I'm innumerate) species of bat in the country.  Might be the biggest bat home/nest/cave/resting place in the country.  I would love to see them.  When one strayed into my garage, I had to have the Bat Person round.  We drank a bottle of red whilst waiting for the little darling to leave......


@Duchess Good sound advice. Smiley HappyAn expert is coming around later.I'm hoping its not one of those vampire types Smiley Sad Don't know the type of bat, but its been snacking in the dark and leaving a calling card, so I don't know if that is luck or muck?

 

I presume you had a bottle of red wine?

 

I hope it dosen't live in my roof

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Regular Contributor
Posts: 466
Registered: ‎18-02-2015

Re: Bat in the Bedroom

I had a bat in my bathroom (which my kids loved). I tried catching it and letting it go. Afterwards I read that you should release them when it is dark. 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,358
Registered: ‎21-02-2015

Re: Bat in the Bedroom

[ Edited ]

@BigAllyou have done the right thing to call in a specialist...All bats are protected by law and can only be handled or moved by people licenced to do so but you can contain them according to the advice provided via one of the links below (sorry Lidl I know this isn't good practice here but I thought it was useful!)  We have them in our loft and they've been there for as long as we have lived here - over 17 years and we've never had a problem with them so I feel very strongly about leaving them alone. I feel privileged to see them flitting and hunting across the front of the house in the dusk

 

Look at the pages for the Bat Conservation Trust, I've copied the main info here..sorry it's long but worth reading..this should tell you all you need to  know...Woman Happy

 

In Britain all bat species and their roosts are legally protected, by both domestic and international legislation. This means you will be committing a criminal offence if you:

  1. Deliberately capture, injure or kill a bat
  2. Intentionally or recklessly disturb a bat in its roost or deliberately disturb a group of bats
  3. Damage or destroy a bat roosting place (even if bats are not occupying the roost at the time)
  4. Possess or advertise/sell/exchange a bat (dead or alive) or any part of a bat
  5. Intentionally or recklessly obstruct access to a bat roost

 

What should I do if there's a bat in a room? Bat isn't flying

If the bat has landed then it should be contained according to the advice found here. Always wear gloves to handle bats. If you need help, call the Bat Helpline 0345 1300 228

  Bat is flying around a room or living space

NEVER try to catch a flying bat you are likely to injure it severely and it may even bite in self defence.

If it's a warm evening the best thing to do is:

  • Close the door to the room
  • Open the windows to the outside as widely as possible
  • Dim the lights

This will give the bat a chance to find its own way out.

If you are not sure it has flown out, it is best to look high up in places such as in the folds of curtains and behind picture frames, (a healthy bat will want to be out of reach and out of the light) or in low level places (if a bat is injured or in trouble it will struggle to hide properly).

If you find a bat flying during daylight hours:

During the winter, please call the National Bat Helpline on 0345 1300 228 as the bat may need to be assessed by a bat carer.

Sometimes in the summer, young bats, which are inexperienced flyers, will become exhausted before finding their way out. They may try to land on a wall or curtains, or they may crash land on furniture or the floor. In this case, you should contain the bat, and then release it at dusk.

 

Bats are always turning up inside

Bats frequently finding their way into your house may indicate that you have bats roosting in your property. More information about being a roost owner can be found here.

 

Bats entering the living spaces of a home on a regular basis is not a normal part of having a roost, and there is help and advice available. Call the National Bat Helpline on 0345 1300 228 to discuss the situation with one of our Bat Advice Officers.

 

How are bats getting in?

Bats have a very sophisticated system for finding their way around in the dark, but despite this, some do end up getting trapped inside buildings. Bats are very small and need only a very small space in order to gain access which means it can sometimes be very hard to tell how a bat got in.

 

Their external access has been blocked

Sometimes moving items around in the loft will inadvertently block the bats' access point(s).  The bats will then be forced to search for an alternative exit route.  We would recommend that you carefully move items away from the eaves and roof slopes.